2011_Trampeltier_1528With the January weather, you might find yourself wishing you lived someplace warm, like the hot deserts where camels make their homes. But even though camels live in deserts, that doesn’t mean that they never have to face the cold. Bactrian camels (the ones with two humps) live in mountainous regions of Asia where it gets to be 122°F in the summer, but -20° on winter nights. Camels are tough, though—in addition to thriving in extreme temperatures, they’re also famously able to go for long periods without water. When it’s hot out, they can go a week without a drink—and when it’s cooler, they can last up to six months without water. They don’t even get much moisture from their food—their diet includes dry sticks, salty plants, and thorns. (By the way, they don’t store water in their humps—those are full of fat!)
Thanks to their hardiness, camels have been valued by people all over the world for thousands of years. You’re probably familiar with domesticated camels in Asia and Africa, but there are other camels closer to home that you might not have thought about. Some humpless wild camels in South America have been domesticated, creating two animals that you might know: alpacas and llamas.

 

Photo source: Wikimedia Commons

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